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European Round 2014

Conference details

The ‘CyberSecurity for the Next Generation’ conference which will be hosted at Politecnico di Milano, December 10-12, 2013.

Eligible countries: Bachelor, Master and Ph.D. students from the following countries can participate in the European round of the conference: Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, FYROM, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Montenegro, Slovakia (Slovak Republic), Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.

Participation is free. Kaspersky Lab will cover all participants’ travel and accommodation expenses. By submitting a paper, participants give their consent for Kaspersky Lab to publish their work at academy.kaspersky.com

The best projects will be given awards and valuable prizes (1st place $1500, 2nd place $1000 and 3rd place $750) from Kaspersky Lab and the authors will be invited to attend the international ‘CyberSecurity for the Next Generation’ conference.

Paper Submission Process and Paper Format

Download formatting guidelines here. Use the document template to help conform to the guidelines.

Submissions should be made using our conference paper management system, details of which will be sent upon registration. Papers should be in Word (DOC), or Rich Text Format (RTF) only (i.e. other formats will NOT be accepted). If necessary, files may be compressed, using ZIP format only. The ZIP file must contain two documents, .DOC format – i.e. an abstract of your paper and your full paper. Papers that do not meet the formatting instructions will be returned to the authors for revision. We are unable to accept PDF or PS files.

Please download and read the strict formatting guidelines. Failure to do so will mean us having to return papers for proper completion.

In addition, please use the supplied document template to help conform to the guidelines.

The total length of the paper should not exceed ten pages, including all figures, tables and references. Hyperlinks should be removed from the paper for both email addresses and web pages.

You can find more info on our dedicated facebook page & the conference video.

Agenda

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Time Event Location
09:45 - 10:15 Guest Registration, Welcome coffee Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, Leonardo Campus, Aula Rogers
10:15 - 10:30 Welcoming Remarks: Aldo Delbo/ General Manager, Italy & Mediterranean, Kaspersky lab Natalya Obelets/ Deputy Head of Education Initiatives, Kaspersky Lab Donatella Sciuto/Vice Rector,Full Professor in Computer Engineering/Politecnico di Milano
10:30 - 11:10 Corrado Giustozzi/Member of the Permanent Stakeholders' Group at ENISA/Facing the Transnationality of Cybercrime
11:10 - 11:30 Marco Preuss/Director, Europe, Global Research & Analysis Team, Kaspersky Lab/Cybercriminal-Underground
11:30 - 11:50 Coffee break
11:50 - 12:05 Web Honeypots 2.0: an Analysis of Exploitation Behaviors on the Web/Eurecom/Maurizio Abbà
12:05 - 12:20 Emulate virtual machines to avoid malware infections/Institut obert of Catalonia/Jordi Vazquez Aira
12:20 - 12:35 Securing corporate infrastructure in Israel: beyond Critical Infrastructure Protection/Tel Aviv University/Lior Tabansky
12:35 - 12:50 Hierarchical clustering on a lightweight feature set based on extensive dynamic analysis/Royal Holloway/David Korczynski
12:50 - 13:05 Cyber? Yes. Attack? Legally speaking, it depends…/Jagiellonian University/Kaja Kowalczewska
13:05 - 14:15 Lunch
14:15 - 14:30 Methodological approach to security awareness/Eurecom/Predrag Tasevski
14:30 - 14:45 Increasing Awareness and Education of IT Security amongst Elementary School Kids aged 7-13 years/University of Sarajevo & University of Bolton/Amela Trokic
14:45 - 15:00 Detecting CSRF attack origin by collecting HTTP(S) requests relations/Bulgarian Academy of Science/Angel Inkov
15:00 - 15:15 Preserving Smartphone Users' Anonymity in Cloudy Days/University of Pauda/Mario Leone
15:15 - 15:30 Fight Fire with Fire: The Ultimate Active Defence against Malware Epidemics/Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam/Armando Miraglia
15:30 - 15:50 Coffee break
15:50 - 16:20 Panel Discussion/Advanced Persistent Threats or just Carefully Engineered Malware?/Moderatot Dr. Stefano Ortolani, Educational Initiatives Manager, Kaspersky Lab
Thursday, December 12, 2013
Time Event Location
09:15 - 9:30 Welcome coffee Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, Leonardo Campus, Aula Rogers
09:30 - 09:50 Robert Kooj/Affiliation is with TNO and TU Delft/Modeling Malware Spread
09:50 - 10:05 MITHYS: Mind The Hand You Shake/University of Padua/Sebastiano Gottardo
10:05 - 10:20 A Framework for Automated Instrumentation of Android Applications/Technical University Munich/Christopher Will
10:20 - 10:35 Stuxnet – A New Threat for Critical Infrastructure/University of Belgrade/Marko Ivanovic
10:35 - 10:50 CSI Effects in Bollywood/University of Warwick/Roma Gandhi
10:50 - 11:05 Web Usability and User Behaviour: The Security of Passwords/Plymouth University/Cassy Marie Freeman
11:05 - 11:40 Coffee break / Program Committee Meeting
11:40 - 12:00 Maria Garnaeva/Security Researcher, EEMEA Research Center (Russia), Kaspersky Lab/The APT Landscape: 2013
12:00 - 12:30 Awards Ceremony
12:30 - 14:00 Lunch
Friday, December 13, 2013
Time Event
up to 12:00 Departure day

Finalists

 

Roma Gandhi

University of Warwick, UK

CSI Effects in Bollywood

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The term “CSI effect” is derived from the popular American TV show CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. Some of the concepts explained in the TV serial have influenced the general public in terms of what they understand about the capabilities, technical boundaries and limitations of Cyber security, digital forensics, forensic science and information technology in general. The CSI effect creates unreasonable expectations on the part of jurors and the public and can have particularly adverse effects particularly in trials where the jury and even judges fail to understand technological concepts. This paper concentrates on the CSI effect in Bollywood. In particular we analyse a series of popular films and the way in which cyber security is portrayed therein. We formulate and propose three types of CSI effect and demonstrate these in the context of the films that we highlight. The Bollywood film industry in particular is selected because it is the largest film industry in the world and is impacting and influencing the fastest growing and possibly the largest IT population in the world. Further to this, the growth of Cyber Security in India is particularly big which means that a generation of cyber security professionals may be growing up under the influence of portrayals of cyber security in Bollywood films. Download Abstract

 

Jordi Vazquez Aira

Institut obert of Catalonia, Spain

Emulate virtual machines to avoid malware infections

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To analyze malware it is very common to use both Sandbox and virtual machines. That way you can run the malicious software in a controlled and clean environment in order to detect any change in the Windows registry, file system and connections and see how it behaves. The use of Sandbox or virtual machines as a testing environment is well known by malware developers and they prepare their software to not be run if it detects a controlled environment. The purpose of this research is to study the virtual machine (Virtual Box) and try to simulate it on a physical machine in order to avoid infectetion by malware.

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Lior Tabansky

Tel Aviv University, Israel

Securing corporate infrastructure in Israel: beyond Critical Infrastructure Protection

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Cyber Security requires a combination of technological capacity with economic and policy tools. Israel has developed a unique legal and regulatory model for critical infrastructure protection, and implemented it for 10 years. However, the threat landscape is constantly changing. Ubiquitous connectivity rendered some of the older arrangements inadequate. We identify and analyse a novel approach for securing corporate infrastructure in Israel, adapting to the different needs by utilizing a more cooperative approach with the market and closer cooperation with world's IT security vendors. We suggest that such a framework is mostly replicable in other countries. Download Abstract

 

David Korczynski

Royal Holloway, UK

Hierarchical clustering on a lightweight feature set based on extensive dynamic analysis

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The distribution of Android malware has hugely increased the last years. This cries for malware analysists to be able to quickly understand the behaviour of the infected Android applications. Clustering has shown as an excellent method for dividing data into clusters based on their similarities. In this paper, I propose a clustering algorithm combined with a lightweight feature set that divides Android malware into groups. The algorithm is run on output from a dynamic analysis with more than 1000 Android malware samples. My results show that by using a lightweight feature set, it is possible to produce clusters with many similarities of malware families generated from extensive manual analysis. Securing corporate infrastructure in Israel: beyond Critical Infrastructure Protection Download Abstract

 

Predrag Tasevski

Eurecom, France

Methodological approach to security awareness

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Currently, humans coupled with the socio-technical aspect can be either the strongest or the weakest link in any information security, and the key in security lies in delivering awareness training through short and effective online videos, whereby the participator can gain knowledge on security. Our aim, therefore, is to develop innovative solutions to deliver an interactive cybersecurity awareness program, where the main goal is to enhance information on security awareness and knowledge in organizations, schools, nations, homes etc. The syllabus that we present consists of a unique systematic approach divided into three target groups: basic, advance and management. Also we present a different method in measuring the knowledge of each participant, and compare it to the base-line survey carried out during the registration. Our results show the participant’s awareness level of knowledge. By implementing this program in private and public organizations, governments, schools and universities will lead to the improvement of IT security awareness levels in the everyday use of computers, mobile phones, online banking, and social networking - both at home and in the workplace. Download Abstract

 

Kaja Kowalczewska

Jagiellonian University, Poland

Cyber? Yes. Attack? Legally speaking, it depends...

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Paper deals with the legal definition of attack under international humanitarian law, analysed in the context of cyber “attacks”. The armed nature of cyber operation is distinguished from a violent one and therefore special section is devoted to the indirect consequences of cyber attacks. It is also noted that the incremental resort to automated weapon systems, controlled by computer networks still highly vulnerable to hostile malware and interference, challenges the current state of law. Finally, the author attempts to render the linkage between law and IT, both greatly concerned with cyber security. Download Abstract

 

Amela Trokic

University of Sarajevo & University of Bolton, Bosnia, UK

Increasing Awareness and Education of IT Security amongst Elementary School Kids aged 7-13 years

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Children are becoming more prone to IT security threat than ever before yet their awareness levels are minimal with education lacking in the field. In an attempt to increase awareness and education of IT security issues amongst elementary school children aged 7-13 we have developed an innovative campaign entitled “Get a Clue!” The campaign advertises the threats using traditional tools but making them more relatable to children by mimicking the well known game “Clue”. A companion website offers resources which includes the innovative simulation game created to simulate real life IT security scenarios based on the child’s actual profile (information they input). In light of a lacking curriculum, a classroom version also allows teachers to educate their students using the game and testing their knowledge of cyber safety and security by managing settings through their own account. The campaign and specifically the game provide a new more practical approach to raising awareness and educating young children on IT security issues. Download Abstract

 

Maurizio Abbà

Eurecom, France

Web Honeypots 2.0: an Analysis of Exploitation Behaviors on the Web

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In the last years, several studies have analyzed how web attacks are performed and how they exploit vulnerabilities that are found on the web. However, none of them has sufficiently studied the typical behavior of an attacker, i.e., the reason(s) why he or she is exploiting websites. This work presents the design, implementation, and deployment of a network of 500 fully functional honeypot websites, hosting a range of different services, whose aim is to attract attackers and collect information on what they do during and after their attacks. We developed a novel platform for the automatic collection, normalization and clustering of files that attackers upload or modify on the honeypots. Finally, we report the results of an in-depth analysis of the files collected by our honeypots during their first 100 days of experiment. During this time frame, our system automatically collected, normalized, and clustered over 85,000 files that were created during approximately 6,000 attacks. By analyzing the clusters, we were able to draw a general picture of the attack landscape, identifying the behavior behind each action performed both during and after the exploitation of a web application. Download Abstract

 

Mario Leone

University of Padua, Italy

Preserving Smartphone Users’ Anonymity in Cloudy Days

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The mobile cloud computing paradigm involves communications between smartphones and their virtual (software) clones in the cloud. It offers both backup/recovery solutions as well as offload of mobile computations, increasing the communication and computation capabilities of smartphones and making their limited batteries last longer. Unfortunately, in this scenario, the privacy of the users is at stake. The cellular network operator knows how often users contact the cloud, and the cloud provider knows how often users’ clones contact each other. We address this privacy problem by providing an anonymous communication protocol, leveraging properties of social networks and ad-hoc wireless networks. Our solution provides anonymous end-to-end communication between two users in the network, and in turn between a user and her clone in the cloud. The proposal copes with an adversary model, where each party observing a portion of the communication (including the cloud provider and the cellular network operator) possibly colludes with others to uncover the identity of communicating users. Download Abstract

 

Armando Miraglia

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Fight Fire with Fire: The Ultimate Active Defence against Malware Epidemics

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In the recent years malwares and botnets have become one of the major threats in the cyber-world. These malicious pieces of software can cause harm not only to the infected victims, but also to actors at a much larger scale. For this reason, defenders, namely security researchers and analysts, and law enforcement, have fought back and contained the spreading infections. However, the fight is fundamentally asymmetric. While attackers have neither ethical nor legal constraints, defenders are required to follow much stricter rules and develop significantly more intricate tools. Additionally, attackers have been improving their malwares to make them more resilient to takeovers. In this paper we argue the need to equip defenders with more powerful active defence tools like malwares and botnets, called antidotes, which must be employed as last resort to mitigate malware epidemics. Additionally, we argue the validity of this approach by considering the ethical and legal concerns of leveraging sane and compromised hosts to mitigate malware epidemics. Finally, we further provide evidence of the possible success of these practices by applying our approach to Hlux, Sality and Zeus malwares. Download Abstract

 

Sebastiano Gottardo

University of Padua,Italy

MITHYS: Mind The Hand You Shake

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Recent studies have shown that a significant number of mobile applications, often handling sensitive data such as bank accounts and login credentials, suffers from SSL vulnerabilities. Most of the time, these vulnerabilities are due to improper use of the SSL protocol (in particular, in its handshake phase), resulting in applications exposed to man-in-the-middle attacks. In this paper, we present MITHYS, a system able to: (i) detect applications vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks, and (ii) protect them against these attacks. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal by means of a prototype implementation in Android, named MITHYSApp. A thorough set of experiments assesses the validity of our solution in detecting and protecting mobile applications from man-in-the-middle attacks, without introducing significant overheads. Finally, MITHYSApp does not require any special permissions nor OS modifications, as it operates at the application level. These features make MITHYSApp immediately deployable on a large user base. Download Abstract

 

Christopher Will

Technical University Munich, Germany

A Framework for Automated Instrumentation of Android Applications

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Android has become the most popular mobile operating system. But together with its popularity, risks and threats have emerged as well. This includes malware, of course, but also issues like data stealing and careless programming. This paper presents a framework to instrument Android apps and illustrates how it can be used to inject a dynamic taint tracking analysis into an existing app. Download Abstract

 

Marko Ivanovic

University of Belgrade, Serbia

Stuxnet – A New Threat for Critical Infrastructure

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This research aimed to find a relationship between usability of websites and password setting behaviours. More specifically, it aimed to identify whether or not there was a link between guidance given on password setting and the strength of the password set. The way in which this was carried out was to develop three differing versions of the same website with varying degrees of usability; both general and security usability. Participants were asked to register on a version of this website in order to create a username and password which would be used for analysis. Once participants had registered on the website they were asked to complete a survey asking them about their experience with the website they were presented. Data from the website and survey was analysed to find some interesting results including evidence that suggests that password guidance is actively looked for when creating passwords, that language does not impact the response given to security messages, that IT experience affects password setting behaviours, and most noticeably that guidance given during password creation improves the strength of the password set. Download Abstract

 

Angel Inkov

Bulgarian Academy of Science, Bulgaria

Detecting CSRF attack origin by collecting HTTP(S) requests relations

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The intention of this paper it to analyse various methods we can use to detect the origin of a successful or unsuccessful CSRF attack when the attack vector was some recently visited website. This could become possible if we have access to the HTTP(S) requests relations. We look at various HTTP headers that can be used to form such relations and propose a solution based on the relatively new Content Security Policy (CSP) specification. Additionally we consider the role web browser extensions could play in this scenario. In more general context, the knowledge of these relations will give us additional possibilities to monitor their status and to react on changes. Download Abstract

 

Cassy Marie Freeman

Plymouth University, UK

Web Usability and User Behaviour: The Security of Passwords

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This research aimed to find a relationship between usability of websites and password setting behaviours. More specifically, it aimed to identify whether or not there was a link between guidance given on password setting and the strength of the password set. The way in which this was carried out was to develop three differing versions of the same website with varying degrees of usability; both general and security usability. Participants were asked to register on a version of this website in order to create a username and password which would be used for analysis. Once participants had registered on the website they were asked to complete a survey asking them about their experience with the website they were presented. Data from the website and survey was analysed to find some interesting results including evidence that suggests that password guidance is actively looked for when creating passwords, that language does not impact the response given to security messages, that IT experience affects password setting behaviours, and most noticeably that guidance given during password creation improves the strength of the password set. Download Abstract

Winners

 

Maurizio Abbà

Eurecom, France

The first prize goes to Maurizio Abbà for the paper “Web Honeypots 2.0: an Analysis of Exploitation Behaviors on the Web”

 

Sebastiano Gottardo

University of Padua,Italy

The second prize goes to Sebastiano Gottardo for the paper “MITHYS: Mind The Hand You Shake”

 

David Korczynski

Royal Holloway, UK

The third prize goes to David Korczynski for the paper “Hierarchical clustering on a lightweight feature set based on extensive dynamic analysis”

 

Amela Trokic

University of Sarajevo & University of Bolton, Bosnia, UK

Best presentation skills prize goes to Amela Trokic

Program committee

 

Dr. Stefano Ortolani

Education Initiatives Manager

Kaspersky Lab

Stefano Ortolani joined Kaspersky Lab in 2012 as Security Researcher. Since then his responsibilities have included conducting scientific research in collaboration with universities and governmental agencies. His research interests comprise intrusion detection, malware analysis, systems security, and communications privacy. Prior to joining Kaspersky Lab, since 2008 Stefano worked as a Systems Security Researcher at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands. As Ph.D. Candidate, he published a number of papers in international conference proceedings, as well as in international journals; he later earned his Ph.D. by successfully defending his dissertation titled "Keylogger Detection and Containment". Stefano also holds an MSc in Computer Science awarded summa cum laude from the Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Italy.

 

Prof. Luigi V. Mancini

Research Center of Cyber Intelligence and Information Security (CIS)

Università di Roma “La Sapienza”

Full Professor and Deputy Director of the Research Center of Cyber Intelligence and Information Security (CIS). His current research interests include: computer network and information security,  secure multicast communication, public key infrastructure, authentication protocols, system survivability, computer privacy, wireless network security, and fault-tolerant distributed systems. He published more than 100 scientific papers in international conferences and journals, and has received more than 2,600 citations. He is the founder of the Information and Communication Security (ICSecurity) Laboratory, and of the two Master's degree programs in Information and Network Security of the University of Rome "La Sapienza". He carries out scientific collaborations in the context of numerous national and international projects, and in particular, he was responsible for the research unit of the project ExTrABIRE, funded by the European Commission's Directorate General Home Affairs. Luigi V. Mancini received his PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, in 1989.

 

Dr. Bruno Crispo

University of Trento

Prof. Bruno Crispo's research activity in the area of malware is characterized by two main strands. The first aims at discovering new possible attacks and attack vectors for infrastructure and systems other than the Internet, in order to show the vulnerabilities of such  systems. The second strand aims at investigating new techniques and methods for detecting malware by using the anomalous behaviour approach. The application of such techniques to mobile malware is also of particular interest.

 

Dr. Federico Maggi

Professor of Computer Security

Politecnico di Milano

Federico Maggi is a Post-doctorate Researcher at Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Politecnico di Milano in Italy, working at the NECST Laboratory with Prof. Stefano Zanero. Specifically, his research interests are in analysis of malicious activity, Internet measurements and mobile malware. He is also actively involved in research projects funded by the European Union. During his PhD he studied and made contributions in the field of intrusion detection: he developed and tested anomaly-based tools to mitigate Internet threats by (1) avoiding their spread via vulnerable web applications, (2) detecting unexpected activities in the operating system's kernel (sing of malware infections or compromised processes), and (3) dealing with high number of alerts using alert correlation. At Politecnico di Milano he has been involved in teaching since he received a Bachelor Degree. During his Master of Science, he was TA for undergraduate-level courses on computer programming, he thought classes in graduate-level courses of computer and network security, as well as non-security courses, on topics such as computer system performance evaluation and information systems.

 

Marco Preuss

Director, Europe, Global Research & Analysis Team

Kaspersky Lab

Marco was appointed Director of Europe for the company’s Global Research & Analysis Team in March 2013. Prior to becoming Director of Europe, Marco served as the Head of Kaspersky Lab’s Global Research & Analysis Team in Germany. Marco brings more than 13 years of IT security experience to his role and is responsible for managing the threat landscape in Europe while specializing in web and social networking threats and Apple OS security. Apart from research, Marco is responsible for maintaining close contact with independent testers and security partners. Marco began his career with Kaspersky Lab back in 2004 as a Technical Consultant, providing expert knowledge on Linux and Unix-based systems. He has also been involved in corporate sales management, before moving on to become the technical contact for the OEM department, supporting customized solutions. Marco has participated in the development of web-based services and systems for the Marketing and Retail Sales departments and has worked extensively with the Company’s product design teams. Marco joined the research team as a Virus Analyst in 2009.

 

Paolo Ottolina

Corriere della Sera

Paolo Ottolina. Born in Asti in 1974. After attending the Institute for Journalism in Milan, he has worked for Corriere della Sera since 2001. He works as a senior editor on the pubication's website. He is focused on technology and innovation, with particular attention to Personal Technology about which he writes in the newspaper and the Mal di Tech blog (malditech.corriere.it). He is among the co-authors of the book "Steve Jobs, a year later," dedicated to the legacy of the founder of Apple.

 

Prof.dr.ir. Robert Kooij

Affiliated to TNO and TU Delft

TU Delft

Prof.dr.ir. R.E. (Robert) Kooij is a principal scientist at TNO, dealing with quality aspects of ICT networks. Since 2009 he has managed the TNO knowledge program on Critical ICT Infrastructures, which covers over 30 projects and has an annual budget exceeding €3million. In this field he has also contributed to the ICT Roadmap for the Dutch government. Since 2005 he has also had an affiliation with the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science at the Delft University of Technology. Since 2010 he has been a part-time full professor, on the chair “Robustness of Complex Networks”. Apart from ICT networks Robert also has a vivid interest in serious gaming, mainly in the field of education.

 

Mariya Garnaeva

Security Researcher, EEMEA Research Center (Russia)

Kaspersky Lab

Maria joined Kaspersky Lab in 2008 as a malware analyst. She focuses on botnet research, malware analysis and providing malware detections. Maria is a graduate of the Bauman Moscow State Technical University.

 

Dr. Christoph Skornia

Professor, Information Security Faculty

University of applied sciences, Regensburg

Christoph Skornia studied math and physics at the University of Regensburg and finished his PhD in 2001 after working on fundamental problems in quantum-theory at the Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics. After his academic studies he started work as a consultant in the IT security industry for Check Point Software Technologies, where he was promoted to the position of regional technical director for central Europe. After getting a call for a professorship at the University of Applied Management in Erding, he left Check Point in 2009 and started to teach business mathematics. At the same time he started a local business for Algorithmic Security in central Europe, working as its regional director. In 2012 he accepted an offer from the University of Applied Sciences in Regensburg, where he took over responsibility for education and the Lab for information security, which is researching new security technologies, currently focusing on Cloud Storage, Mobile Payment and Static Analysis.

 

Corrado Giustozzi

Member of the Permanent Stakeholders' Group at ENISA

Guest Speaker

Information security consultant. A member of the Permanent Stakeholders' Group at the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA) since 2010. Since 1986 he has dealt with: cryptography and digital data protection; information security governance in complex organizations; digital forensics and computer crimes; cyberterrorism and cyberwarfare; electronic intelligence and counterintelligence; homeland security and protection of critical infrastructures; digital citizenship, privacy and human rights. He is a professor on contract at several Italian universities, a cybersecurity and cybercrime consultant for Italian police forces and law-enforcement agencies, an official expert on computer crimes at the Criminal Court of Justice in Rome, a member of the National Security Observatory at Ce.Mi.S.S. (Italian Military Center for Strategic Studies). A frequent keynote speaker and lecturer at many national conferences, he has also been featured on national radio and television programs. He authored four books and more than 1,000 articles. He holds the certifications: BS7799 Lead Auditor (BSI), ISO 27001 Lead Auditor (BSI), CISM (ISACA), CRISC (ISACA), C|CISO (EC Council). He is a member of: ISACA (Information Systems Audit and Control Association); Computer Society of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) and a senior member of ACM (Association for Computing Machinery). Besides cybersecurity Corrado has strong interests in photography, electronic music, ludolinguistics and mind games.

Location

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Registration

Important Dates

 Submissions Deadline: Friday 8th November 2013  Notification Deadline: Friday 15th November 2013

European Round Conference Brochure

Conference Brochure

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